svæver over
svæver over
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m-a-d-a-m-e-thenardier:

Lili St. Cyr, burlesque dancer. Arrested in Los Angeles in 1947 for lewd behavior while dancing at the Follies Theater
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dearhomme:

Sebastian Sauve | Ph: Steven Klein 
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fuckyesoldhollywood:

Katharine Hepburn
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mizaralkora:

Henri Zerdoun
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kasinski:

Salvador Dalí and Yves Saint Laurent. by Alécio de Andrade
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twenty20four4:

Cartago, Cartago Province, Costa Rica:
Coloured tapes are tied to a statue of Jesus inside the San Antonio de Padua church before a procession known as ‘Jesus Nazareno of the Tapes’ in Cartago, 25km (16 miles) east of San José. According to the priest of the church, people tie ribbons to the statue to to symbolise promises they make to Jesus during Holy Week.
Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters
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1bohemian:

George Danell:   Rome  1950
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millionsmillions:


Némirovsky writes with tremendous compassion, particularly for the  utterly blameless Michauds, but she is unsparing in her assessment of  her crueler and more thoughtless characters. Following the exodus in  “Storm in June,” the second-oldest Péricand child — Hubert, a teenager —  sits in a church and contemplates his family’s behavior during their  flight from the city:
He judged his family with bitterness and a painful  harshness. His grievances whirled around in his mind in the form of  brief, violent images, without him being able to express them clearly:  …their cars full to bursting with fine linen and silver caught up among  the refugees, and his mother, pointing to women and children forced to  walk with just a few bits of clothing wrapped in a piece of cloth,  saying, “Do you see how good our Lord Jesus is? Just think, we could be  those unfortunate wretches!” Hypocrites, frauds!
It’s a cliché to say that times of disaster and upheaval reveal us  for who we are, but I believe there’s some truth to it. Irène  Némirovsky’s characters are variously revealed by war and dangerous  politics to be weak, courageous, venal, or honorable, and she knew of  what she wrote.
She was Jewish, born in Russia, the daughter of a fantastically  successful banker. The Némirovskys had fled the Bolsheviks and arrived  in a country where they believed they’d be safe. Irène Némirovsky  embraced France completely, and for a time, at least, France seemed to  embrace her. She found fame as a novelist at twenty-six and was  catapulted into French literary society. But by the time she began Suite Française in 1941, the same editors and critics who’d celebrated her before the  war had turned away. Her letters went unanswered. Anti-Semitic tirades  were published by her former friends. Her books were removed from her  first publisher’s catalogue.
Words written in her notebook in 1941: “My God! What is this country  doing to me? Since it is rejecting me, let us consider it coldly, let us  watch as it loses its honor and its life. And the other countries? What  are they to me? Empires are dying. Nothing matters.” The betrayal was  absolute.

Excerpted from Emily St. John Mandel's “Irène Némirovsky, Suite Française, and The Mirador" which was nominated for the 3 Quarks Daily Literary Award.
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oppalescents:

fumae:

the people around her seem to be so distraught by her beauty, and to me that’s what makes this picture even more breathtaking

this is my favourite picture
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orphanwork:

Ilse Bing, “Self-Portrait with Leica” (1931)
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aurai:

Sergei Brushko
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Es imposible volvernos instruidos si solo leemos lo que nos gusta.
Joseph Joubert. Sobre arte y literatura
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stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: Fifth Avenue, 1975 - Photo by Bruce Gilden
When a picture speaks a thousand words.